Archive for December, 2008

Canine team from Ventura gets into the holiday spirit

Posted in police dog teams, police dogs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 22, 2008 by wardogmarine

 

Ventura Police Department K9 Team Thanks the Community and Partners with Local Radio Station to Donate Toys for the Holidays

VPD Community News
Thursday, December 11, 2008

On December 10, 2008 Ventura Police Department (VPD) K9 Officers Jack Ortega, and K9 Partner Felix, along with K9 Officers Jamie Nave and Scott Garrett, appeared on “Bo In the Morning” (morning talk show on B-95.1) and presented over $300 in toys for the annual Toys For Tots toy drive.

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Pictured left to right: Officer Jack Ortega, K9 Felix, Officer Jamie Nave, Officer Scott Garrett, and Bo Jaxon, B-95.1 morning show co-host, with some of the toys donated by the VPD K9 Team- Photo by VPD

“This is a great way for us to give back to the community and to say thank you for the tremendous support”, said Officer Ortega. Officer Ortega noted that the department’s K9 Team and its four dogs are supported primarily through funds donated via the National Police Dog Foundation and the community. “The cost of a dog and training (which includes patrol techniques, narcotics, tracking, etc.) can be upwards of $20,000 and without community support a K9 program at VPD would not be possible”, said Lieutenant Tom Taylor who oversees VPD’s K9 Team.

While on air Officer Ortega also mentioned that his partner, Felix, will be retiring at the end of December after eight years of service. “Felix has been an incredible partner and served this community with dedication and bravery”, noted Ortega. Ortega, VPD’s most senior K9 Officer, will continue as a handler and receive a new partner shortly after the New Year.

vpd_communitynews_20081211_060814_p2_t600Officer Jack Ortega, K9 Partner Felix, and Bo Jaxon, B-95.1 morning show co-host on air. Photo by VPD

To learn more about VPD’s K9 Team and the National Police Dog Foundation, or to make a donation please visit www.venturapd.org orwww.policedogfoundation.org.

Oregon Sheriff’s Office adds new K9

Posted in police dog teams, police dogs with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 22, 2008 by wardogmarine

Tigard Police Proudly Adds New K-9

On Monday, Tigard Police Officer Brian Jackson was officially recognized as a certified K-9 Handler with the State of Oregon. Officer Jackson recently completed a 400 hour K-9 training program offered locally through the Washington County Sheriff’s Office. A total of seven officers, representing six local police agencies, received K-9 Handler certification at a commencement program held at the Hillsboro Civic Center on March 31st. To successfully complete the program for certification, officers must demonstrate proficiency with hands-on tactical and control skills as well as extensive knowledge of K-9 handling as evidenced by successful completion of a series of written tests.

Tigard’s new K-9, Baxter, was obtained from a vendor in Florida earlier this year. Baxter, just under a year old, was bred in Europe. Prior to Tigard Police selecting Baxter, several other dogs were considered, but for various reasons did not meet the standards for acceptance by Tigard Police. Baxter is a male pure bred German Shepherd. He continually received high marks from the instructors during the ten week training program.
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Officer Jackson will officially begin work as a Tigard Police K9 handler, along with Baxter when they both report for their shift April 2nd. Tigard Police previously halted the K-9 program in 1998 when both K-9’s active at the time were retired. The program has been in hiatus until last year when Tigard City Council approved the reinstatement of the K-9 program for the Police Department.

K-9’s are considered an important component in the continued efforts for a community to remain competitive in the fight to reduce crime. The added ability for tracking, delaying and locating suspects involved in crimes can prove to be invaluable to a police department.

You can learn more here: http://www.tigard-or.gov

Vintage Military Dogs Tribute Video

Posted in Tribute Videos, various k9 videos with tags , , , , , , , , on December 21, 2008 by wardogmarine

This is a very special  military dog tribute video. It is a tribute to the older k9 corps that existed during WWII and specifically the dogs that served in Guam. My favorite part is at 1:20 with the dog looking at the vintage sign that reads U.S. Marines War Dog Training Company. It’s as if the dog is reporting in for duty. I would love to get a hold of that sign. 

Army specialized search dog team in Baghdad proving to be a valuable asset

Posted in Army Dog teams, military working dog handlers, Working Dog News with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 21, 2008 by wardogmarine

Raider K-9 team brings added capabilities to Rashid district

By Sgt. David Hodge, 1st BCT PAO, 4th Inf. Div., MND-B
Blackanthem Military News

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Sgt. James Harrington, a military policeman and dog handler from New Orleans, assigned to the 947th Military Police Detachment, part of the 3rd Infantry Regiment “The Old Guard,” stationed out of Fort Myer, Va., attached to the 1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Multi-National Division – Baghdad, poses with Ryky, a Belgian Malanois, while out on mission Nov. 24 in the Rashid district of southern Baghdad. The duo conducts cache search operations and route clearance in the Rashid district of southern Baghdad. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. James Harrington, 1st BCT, 4th Inf. Div., MND-B)

FORWARD OPERATING BASE FALCON, Iraq – A Multi-National Division – Baghdad Soldier and his four-legged partner recently joined forces with other military dog teams at Forward Operating Base Falcon in helping to make the streets of Baghdad a safer place for Iraqi citizens and Soldiers to live and operate.

    
Sgt. James Harrington, a military policeman and dog handler, attached to the 1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, along with Ryky, his K-9 partner, patrol the streets and communities of southern Baghdad’s Rashid district to search for weapons and make Soldiers a more effective force. 
    
Harrington, assigned to the 947th Military Police Detachment, part of the 3rd Infantry Regiment “The Old Guard,” stationed out of Fort Myer, Va., and his 3-year-old Belgian Malanois partner, completed approximately 52 missions and uncovered more than 25 finds since arriving to Rashid in October.

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Ryky, a three-year-old Belgian Malanois, is partnered with Sgt. James Harrington, a military policeman and dog handler from New Orleans, who is assigned to the 947th Military Police Detachment, part of the 3rd Infantry Regiment “The Old Guard,” stationed out of Fort Myer, Va., attached to the 1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Multi-National Division – Baghdad. The duo conducts cache search operations and route clearance in the Rashid district of southern Baghdad. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. James Harrington, 1st BCT, 4th Inf. Div., MND-B)

Harrington said that Ryky made several significant finds since beginning her mission in Baghdad, to include an AK-47 rifle hidden in a false ceiling and four mortar rounds that led to the discovery of a large mound of hollowed-out munitions. 

Ryky detects odors from many types of munitions, such as ammunition, weapons, mortar rounds, artillery rounds, homemade explosives and trigger devices with residue on them. 

Harrington, a native of New Orleans, said what makes the hollow ceiling discovery so significant is the fact that most K-9s do not acknowledge above space above their own height.

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Ryky, a three-year-old Belgian Malanois, rests next to four 60mm mortar rounds she discovered while on patrol Nov. 26 in the Rashid district of southern Baghdad. Sgt. James Harrington, a native of New Orleans, who is Ryky’s handler, is assigned to the 947th Military Police Detachment, part of the 3rd Infantry Regiment “The Old Guard,” stationed out of Fort Myer, Va., attached to the 1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Multi-National Division – Baghdad. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. James Harrington, 1st BCT, 4th Inf. Div., MND-B)

“Ryky is a very friendly dog,” explained Harrington, a former infantryman in the Marines. “She is not a trained attack dog, so I allow her to be sociable with Soldiers. I let others pet her because it is a big morale booster.”

Harrington met Ryky at the Specialized Service Dog School at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. 

“At the school, the dogs are exposed to helicopter rides, simulated gunfire and simulated mortars to see how they react,” said Harrington, a 14-year military service veteran with six deployments since 1995. “The dogs must be confident around the noises; they can’t just take off running.”

Capable of detecting 19 separate odors on the battlefield and the ability to run off of a leash, the SSD dogs have a distinct advantage out in sector, said Harrington.

“Having Sgt. Harrington and the SSD dog gives me the extra capability to unleash the dog into an open area,” said Staff Sgt. Christopher Ogle, who hails from Dayton, Ohio, and is the kennel master for the Falcon K-9 Team, 40th MP Det., from Fort Sill, Okla., attached to the 1st STB. 

“It is that off-leash capability that puts the handler out of danger,” he said.

Harrington said he feels the ability to multitask while operating in sector and conducting weapon searches is an important quality dog handlers should possess.

“I have to be able to watch for my security, watch for the dog’s security, watch what she is searching, and finally lead the dog in the direction I want her to search in next,” he explained. “I always have to be two steps ahead.” 

Recently, Harrington and Ryky cleared a 600-meter portion of a main thoroughfare in Baghdad for a distinguished visitor; it took them approximately an hour. 

“It would take another dog three hours to complete that stretch of road because they would be on a six-foot leash and the handler has to present everything to the dog,” Harrington stated.
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Sgt. James Harrington, a military policeman and dog handler from New Orleans, assigned to the 947th Military Police Detachment, part of the 3rd Infantry Regiment “The Old Guard,” stationed out of Fort Myer, Va., attached to the 1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Multi-National Division – Baghdad, poses with Ryky, a Belgian Malanois, in front of a weapons cache they discovered while on mission Oct. 26 in the Rashid district of southern Baghdad. The duo conducts cache search operations and route clearance in the Rashid district of southern Baghdad. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. James Harrington, 1st BCT, 4th Inf. Div., MND-B) 

Usually, the team uses a leash while out in sector due to stray dogs and small confined areas, he added, but, if needed, Ryky could be up to 200 yards away and still effectively search an area.

“It takes me out of the equation in case something was to go wrong; we lose a dog, but we don’t lose a handler,” explained Harrington, who has approximately two years experience with dogs.

According to Harrington, the SSD program has potential and is quickly becoming more widespread across all facets of the military.

One particular advantage of SSDs is the dog graduates ready to deploy right after completing the school, added Harrington.

Normal working dogs leave their school able to detect nine odors and receive additional training by their handlers in theater, said Harrington.

It is said in the “dog world” that the dog always out ranks the handler because the dog will lead the handler to where the odor originates, said Harrington.

“I think Ryky and I make Soldiers’ jobs easier because we can search faster, the dog can smell better and she leads from the front,” Harrington stated.

In the future, the need for working dogs may increase on the battlefield thanks to their keen sense of smell and ability to discover weapons with minimal Soldier over watch.

The Falcon K-9 Team currently keeps seven dogs in its kennels to support military operations in southern Baghdad, explained Ogle, who has six years experience handling dogs.

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Ryky, a three-year-old Belgian Malanois, is partnered with Sgt. James Harrington, a military policeman and dog handler from New Orleans, who is assigned to the 947th Military Police Detachment, part of the 3rd Infantry Regiment “The Old Guard,” stationed out of Fort Myer, Va., attached to the 1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Multi-National Division – Baghdad. The duo conducts cache search operations and route clearance in the Rashid district of southern Baghdad. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. James Harrington, 1st BCT, 4th Inf. Div., MND-B)

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

Kunsan Air Base, Korea military working dog team

Posted in Army Dog teams, various k9 videos, Various Teams with tags , , , , , , , , , on December 17, 2008 by wardogmarine

Another great video featuring a mwd team in Korea. Every time I hear a military working dog handler get interviewed they can’t help themselves and say that they get paid to play and work with dogs, how great is that. Although, as much fun as it is, you better believe that it is serious business when it comes time to training. These dog teams are counted on to save lives overseas and throughout the world .

Navy military working dog team in Afghanistan video

Posted in Navy dog teams, various k9 videos, Various Teams with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 17, 2008 by wardogmarine

A report by the Armed Forces Network about a Navy military working dog team at Bagram, Afghanistan. MA3 Gerry Winkler and his mwd Zack are featured in this video titled by MA3 Winkler “Doggie Downtime Down Range”

Fort Huachuca honors military working dog SSgt Britt

Posted in Army Dog teams, fallen dogs, Tribute Videos, Various Teams with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 17, 2008 by wardogmarine

Britt, military working dog, earns last rites befitting hero
Arizona Daily Star ^ | Carol Ann Alaimo 

Britt the bomb-sniffing dog, who served overseas in Bosnia, Kosovo, Iraq and Afghanistan, will get a funeral befitting a hero at Fort Huachuca. The ashes of the Army canine, recently put down due to neurological illness, will be interred behind the kennels that served as his home base as a military color guard looks on.

The 11-year-old German shepherd was euthanized on Sept. 11 and will be buried Dec. 3 at the Southern Arizona Army post.

Following tradition, taps will be played and a flag folded and presented to Sgt. Megan Hobson, Britt’s last handler.

“We lost a fallen comrade,” said Hobson, 24, a Utah native serving with the fort’s 18th Military Police Detachment.

“He may have been a piece of Army equipment, but I loved that dog,” said Hobson, who was with Britt when he died.

The German shepherd held the rank of staff sergeant — military dogs always outrank their handlers by one stripe, to discourage ill treatment of a superior. He had several Army medals to his credit and had worked as an explosives detector dog since 1999.

Overseas, he took part in numerous missions that likely saved lives, officials said. On patrol in Iraq, he unearthed weapons caches and makeshift bombs, and even collared an insurgent by chasing him down.

Hobson, Britt’s handler for three months, arranged for the canine to spend his final days in the Huachuca Mountains doing his favorite things.

“They let me have a couple days with him where he was just a dog, he didn’t have to work,” she recalled.

She bought him doggie delicacies — sirloin steak with mashed potatoes from a Texas Roadhouse restaurant — and they played fetch with his favorite squeaky toy.

Britt had a reputation for nipping people — “love bites” as the handlers call them — but Hobson, a rarity as a female handler, said she never saw that side of him. “I think he needed a woman in his life,” she said.

Fort Huachuca spokeswoman Tanja Linton said the fanfare at an Army dog’s funeral is not quite the same as honors rendered for a human.

Still, she said in a statement, the service aims to pay respects to “a different kind of soldier.”

“Britt served his country with loyalty and distinction,” she said.
● Contact reporter Carol Ann Alaimo at 573-4138 or at calaimo@azstarnet.com.