Archive for the Foreign Dog Teams Category

UK military dog survives ‘explosive’ scare

Posted in Foreign Dog Teams with tags , , on July 18, 2009 by wardogmarine

“Toby is recovering well after getting treatment for eating a dodgy substance in Afghanistan.”-ITN News

Awesome New Zealand K9 Police videos!

Posted in Foreign Dog Teams with tags , , , , on June 7, 2009 by wardogmarine

Some awesome videos from a New Zealand police supporter.

“The NZ Police was originally formed along similar lines to that of the British Police. The NZ Police Dog Section was established in 1956 with the help of Sergeant Frank Riley from Surrey, and mostly based on K9 Policing methods from the UK.

The effectiveness of the Dog Section soon became apparent with a rise in the number of call-outs Dogs were attending each year. Specialist training was introduced and dogs were not only limited to tracking down offenders but could also train in other areas such as; Search and Rescue, Narcotics Detection, Explosives detection, Firearms detection, Armed Offenders Squad support, and recently Accelerant detection(Arson).

Although NZ is a relatively small country, with a low ratio of Police per Capita, the working and training of the NZ Police and Dog Section has been recognised internationally as being of an extremely high standard. Since the late 60s NZ Police have helped other Police Forces establish Sections of their own, to name a few: Victorian State Police, PNG Police, Fijian Police, Samoan Police, Tongan Police.

Their continued efforts and persistance in training and work does pay off, with them apprehending over 6,000 suspects each year and attending 40,000 incidents.

They are one of those groups of special people who make a difference and work towards building safer communities in our country of New Zealand. “-from the videos’ contributor.

Australian military dogs get war service medals

Posted in Foreign Dog Teams, various k9 videos with tags , , , on May 31, 2009 by wardogmarine

Patrol Days Come To an End for Andy

Posted in Foreign Dog Teams with tags , , , on May 11, 2009 by wardogmarine
Published Date:
09 May 2009
A military dog handler who risked rocket attacks and roadside bombs to protect British forces in war-torn Iraq is preparing to fly home.

Corporal Andy Moan is to be reunited with his loved ones in Sunderland after completing a tour of duty in Basra.
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Andy Moan

The RAF police dog handler served with the Theatre Military Dog Support Unit on patrol at the province’s international airport playing a vital security role during the hostilities.

Risking attack by rocket-propelled grenades and Improvised Explosive Devices, the team use their canine counterparts’ razor sharp senses to protect personnel and vital equipment from criminal and terrorist threats.

But last month marked the official end of the six-year British mission in the country and now the 22-year-old, who has also served on operations in Afghanistan, is preparing to join the thousands of troops returning home.

“My duties have included working as a police dog handler, as well as other wider duties involved with the policing of military operations on a civilian airfield,” said Cpl Moan.

“Working closely with my dog, our aim has been to detect and deter any intruders and to provide military working dog support to ongoing transition operations.”

The former Farringdon Community School pupil, who joined the RAF in 2002, is looking forward to flying home and seeing his family, including mum Lynne and dad Colin, and girlfriend Michelle.

“I love you all and will see you soon,” said Cpl Moan. “I’m also looking forward to having home-cooked meals and a few beers with my friends. I’ll see you all when I get back.

“I also want to thank the people of the UK for all their support for the armed forces.”

The Echo is providing returning servicemen and women with the chance to let their friends and loved ones know they are back safe and sound.
We will print messages for free in the Echo, making sure that people are aware they have returned from active service.

The Echo will also publish messages from personnel in the conflict zones.

Anyone wishing to take part should send their messages to james.johnston@northeast-press.co.uk.

Generous businesses are continuing to back the campaign.

Shops, restaurants and visitor attractions across the North East are supporting our drive to offer service personnel discounts on a range of services and products.

Any businesses that wish to take part in the scheme, and be featured in the Echo, should send a brief outline of their business and proposed offers with contact details to james.johnston
@northeast-press.co.uk.

To qualify for the Honour Our Brave offers, service personnel have to show their official ID cards at participating businesses.

Qatar Military Dog Show Enhances Bilateral Relations

Posted in Foreign Dog Teams with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 14, 2009 by wardogmarine

All pictures and Story by Dustin Senger
This article was found here: Qatar Dogs

CAMP AS SAYLIYAH, Qatar – Forty-seven members of the Qatar military police exhibited working dog capabilities for U.S. service members at Camp As Sayliyah, Qatar, April 13. The first-time event was coordinated to enhance bilateral relationships between the two nations’ armed forces, following talks between Maj. Gen Thamer Al Mehshadi, Qatar army military police commander, and Col. David G. Cotter, U.S. Army Central Area Support Group Qatar commander, March 26.

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“I’ve seen a lot of dog shows before but this was really good – especially the drug and bomb detection,” said U.S. Air Force Jennifer Asia Gonzales (center), from Chicago, Ill., after a Qatar military working dog exhibition for U.S service members at Camp As Sayliyah, Qatar, April 13. Gonzales was enjoying a four-day pass from duty in Iraq, by participating in the U.S. Central Command rest and recuperation pass program in Qatar. Also on pass from Iraq (far right): U.S. Air Force Brianne Gordon-Garcia, from Charlotte, N.C. and Army Pfc. Sharmeka Reed, from Hollandale, Miss.

Surrounded by curious spectators, Sgt. Maj. Abdulla Al Ghanem, Qatar army military police canine trainer, directed the demonstration of fitness, skillfulness and obedience. Several German and Belgium shepherds (Malinois), along with an English springer spaniel, traversed through various obstacles and mock scenarios. The dogs showcased aggressive attack procedures, situational restraint during riot control and hostage rescue, as well as detection of narcotics and explosives hidden on persons and vehicles.

“I like how obedient the dogs are,” said U.S. Air Force Jennifer Asia Gonzales, from Chicago, Ill. She was attending the demonstration while enjoying a four-day pass from duty in Iraq, by participating in the U.S. Central Command rest and recuperation pass program in Qatar. “I’ve seen a lot of dog shows before but this was really good – especially the drug and bomb detection.”

“This is paving the way for more military integration in the future,” said Lt. Col. Nasser Al Halbadi, Qatar army military police canine unit commander. “We plan to continue these joint training opportunities, so our military units learn from one another.”

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Belgium shepherds (Malinois) react after stopping a “detainee” escape during a military working dog exhibition for U.S service members at Camp As Sayliyah, Qatar, April 13. The dogs showcased aggressive attack procedures, situational restraint during riot control and hostage rescue, as well as detection of narcotics and explosives hidden on persons and vehicles.
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Lt. Col. Nasser Al Halbadi, Qatar army military police canine unit commander, accepts a token of appreciation from Col. David G. Cotter, U.S. Army Central Area Support Group Qatar commander, after a Qatar military police working dog exhibition for U.S service members at Camp As Sayliyah, Qatar, April 13. The first-time event was coordinated to enhance bilateral relationships between the two nations’ armed forces, following talks between Maj. Gen Thamer Al Mehshadi, Qatar army military police commander, and Cotter, March 26.
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A German shepherd locates a Qatar army military police canine trainer by following nearly 200 meters of tracks during a working dog exhibition for U.S service members at Camp As Sayliyah, Qatar, April 13. Several German and Belgium shepherds (Malinois), along with an English springer spaniel, traversed through various obstacles and mock scenarios to demonstrate fitness, skillfulness and obedience.
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A German shepherd searches for explosives during a Qatar military working dog exhibition for U.S service members at Camp As Sayliyah, Qatar, April 13. The dogs traversed through various obstacles and mock scenarios to demonstrate fitness, skillfulness and obedience.
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Col. David G. Cotter, U.S. Army Central Area Support Group Qatar commander, and Maj. Gen Thamer Al Mehshadi, Qatar army military police commander, finalize talks at Camp As Sayliyah, Qatar, March 26. The two military officers discussed ways to enhance bilateral relationships between the two nations’ armed forces. An exhibition of Qatar military working dog capabilities was immediately offered to the U.S. military installation.
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An English springer spaniel searches for explosives during a Qatar military working dog exhibition for U.S service members at Camp As Sayliyah, Qatar, April 13. The dogs traversed through various obstacles and mock scenarios to demonstrate fitness, skillfulness and obedience.
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Sgt. Khalid Ahmed H. Sulaiti, Qatar army military police canine handler, during a military working dog exhibition for U.S service members at Camp As Sayliyah, Qatar, April 13. The dogs showcased aggressive attack procedures, situational restraint during riot control and hostage rescue, as well as detection of narcotics and explosives hidden on persons and vehicles.
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A Belgium shepherd (Malinois) leaps over a vehicle to apprehend a “terrorist” during a Qatar military working dog exhibition for U.S service members at Camp As Sayliyah, Qatar, April 13. The dogs traversed through various obstacles and mock scenarios to demonstrate fitness, skillfulness and obedience.

Iraqi Police K-9 Commander Learns K-9 Techniques, Handling

Posted in Army Dog teams, Foreign Dog Teams, Military Working Dogs, Working Dog News with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 7, 2009 by wardogmarine

Multi-National Division-Central

Story by Spc. Debralee Crankshaw
FORWARD OPERATING BASE KALSU, Iraq – As the U.S. continues to assist Iraqis in becoming a self-sustaining force, the U.S. is providing them with valuable training, including the use of working dogs.

The 212th Military Police Detachment demonstrated to the Iraqi police K-9 unit commander from Hillah just how essential military working dogs can be in accomplishing the mission during a training excercise, March 15.

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Staff Sgt. Storm jumps a wall on the obstacle course with encouragement from his handler, Sgt. David Ricks, 212th Military Police Detachment, a native of Jourdanton, Texas, as Capt. Anis Fadhil, Iraqi police K-9 unit commander from Hillah observes. The IPs visited the kennels to witness the capabilities of the military working dogs.

The 212th provided a demonstration in basic obedience and aggression. Soldiers gave commands to their dogs, led them through an obstacle course and performed biting and explosives detection exercises.

“The purpose of the training is to show the capabilities of the dogs and get the Iraqis used to training the dogs,” said Staff Sgt. Christopher Rodgers, Forward Operating Base Kalsu kennel master from Bradford, Pa. “It gives them a goal to accomplish. They have seen the capabilities of the dogs so now they have something to work toward.”

Capt. Anis Fadhil, the IP K-9 commander, took the training to heart.

“When we get the dogs, we will try to duplicate the training as closely as possible,” he said.

The training not only showed the commander what to work for, it also information on how to run his own kennel.

“Seeing our kennels helped give him a good idea of how it’s supposed to happen, so they can go back and start their kennels up,” said Rodgers.

This visit was the first of many, according to Rodgers. U.S. handlers will work closely with Iraqi handlers to teach them how to manage working dogs on their next visit.

“This will help Iraq because of the situation everyday with [improvised explosive devices] and suicide bombers,” he said. “This will help decrease that kind of activity.”

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 Capt. Anis Fadhil, Iraqi police K-9 unit commander from Hillah (right) and Dr. Abdil Husain Mohsin, IP K-9 veterinarian, greet Sgt. Xando and his handler, Spc. Timothy Conley, 212th Military Police Detachment K-9 handler and a native of Puyallup, Wash. The IPs visited the kennels to witness the capabilities of the military working dogs.

Read this story here: Iraqi K9 Handling

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Military working dog Sgt. Ccapo attacks Army Spc. Timothy Conley, 212th Military Police Detachment K-9 handler, during a bite exercise to demonstrate the capabilities of the military working dogs to the Iraqi police K-9 commander from Hillah on Forward Operating Base Kalsu, Iraq, March 15, 2009. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Debralee P. Crankshaw  

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Military working dog Sgt. Ccapo attacks Army Spc. Timothy Conley, 212th Military Police Detachment K-9 handler, during a bite exercise to demonstrate the capabilities of the military working dogs to the Iraqi police K-9 commander from Hillah on Forward Operating Base Kalsu, Iraq, March 15, 2009. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Debralee P. Crankshaw
  

Video interview with a British military dog team

Posted in Foreign Dog Teams with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 15, 2009 by wardogmarine

A man and his dog in Helmand

Jamie, an English springer spaniel, has been sniffing around Afghanistan for the last three years. He is now teaching his new handler a thing or two about finding explosives and weapons. Jamie was rescued as a young puppy by the Army nine years ago and was then trained as a search dog at the Royal Army Veterinary Corps in Melton Mowbury, Leicestershire. He can detect the slightest hint of explosives or weapons.